BC Cancer Cervix Screening
Cervix Screening Pilot Project: Tri-Cities (Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Belcarra, Anmore), New Westminster, Sunshine Coast and Central Vancouver Island

AT-HOME

Cervix Screening

Screen for human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that can cause cervical cancer, from the comfort and safety of your own home.

BC Cancer Cervix Screening

AT-HOME

Cervix Screening

Screen for human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that can cause cervical cancer, from the comfort and safety of your own home.

Play an active role in your own health

Quick, easy and painless to do, the at-home cervix screening kit detects high-risk HPV types that can cause cervical cancer. From the comfort of your home, you can collect your own sample by turning a small swab inside your vagina for 20 seconds. Then, you mail in your completed kit and receive your results in 4–6 weeks. It’s as simple as that!

Video also available in MandarinCantonese, and Punjabi.

At-home cervix screening is currently available to select participants in the Tri-Cities (Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Belcarra, Anmore), New Westminster, Sunshine Coast and Central Vancouver Island.

Keep an eye out for a letter or kit in your mail.

If you receive an invitation letter, you can request an at-home screening kit by calling BC Cancer Cervix Screening at: 1-877-702-6566.

At-home cervix screening is currently available to select participants in the Tri-Cities (Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Belcarra, Anmore), New Westminster, Sunshine Coast and Central Vancouver Island..

Keep an eye out for a letter or kit in your mail.

Prevent cervical cancer

You might be familiar with a Pap test, which looks for abnormal cell changes in your cervix. At-home cervix screening involves testing for HPV, the virus that causes these abnormal cell changes.

Screening can help find out if you are at risk for developing abnormal cells. Finding and treating abnormal cells early can help prevent cancer. Screening can also find cancer at an early stage when there are more treatment options. If cervical cancer is caught at its earliest stage, the chance of survival is more than 85 per cent.

Prevent Cervical Cancer

Prevent cervical cancer

You might be familiar with a Pap test, which looks for abnormal cell changes in your cervix. At-home cervix screening involves testing for HPV, the virus that causes these abnormal cell changes.

Screening can help find out if you are at risk for developing abnormal cells. Finding and treating abnormal cells early can help prevent cancer. Screening can also find cancer at an early stage when there are more treatment options. If cervical cancer is caught at its earliest stage, the chance of survival is more than 85 per cent
.

How at-home cervix screening works

Step 1

Your kit will arrive by mail in a plain, unmarked envelope.

Step 2

Complete screening by following the instructions inside your kit.

Step 3

Drop off your completed kit at your nearest post office or post box. Try and drop off your kit the same day you collect your sample.

Step 4

You and your health care provider will get results in 4–6 weeks.

Video also available in MandarinCantonese, and Punjabi.

How at-home cervix screening works

Step 1

Your kit will arrive by mail in a plain, unmarked envelope.

Step 2

Complete screening by following the instructions inside your kit.

Step 3

Drop off your completed kit at your nearest post office or post box. Try and drop off your kit the same day you collect your sample.

Step 4

You and your health care provider will get results in 4–6 weeks.

Video also available in MandarinCantonese, and Punjabi.

What the kit will look like

At-Home Cervix Screening Kit Front
At-Home Cervix Screening Kit Inside

About your screening results

You and your health care provider will receive results in 4–6 weeks after mailing in your kit. Learning you have a high-risk HPV type does not mean you have or will develop cancer. Instead, your results will help you and your health care provider figure out next steps which may include either a Pap test or colposcopy.

Video also available in MandarinCantonese, and Punjabi.

Your questions about at-home cervix screening

What is human papillomavirus (HPV)?
HPV is a very common virus. It spreads easily through any kind of sexual contact, including intimate touching, and oral, vaginal and anal sex. The virus usually goes away on its own without causing any problems.

Does HPV cause cancer?
Most people will have an HPV infection at some point in their lives. Usually, the body’s immune system removes HPV within two years. But sometimes, high-risk HPV types do not clear on their own and can cause the cells in your cervix to become abnormal. These abnormal cells may become cancer cells over time.

How is at-home cervix screening different from a Pap test?
The at-home cervix screening kit looks for HPV, which can cause cervical cancer. Unlike a Pap test, which looks for abnormal cell changes in your cervix, at-home cervix screening looks for the virus that causes these abnormal cell changes. And, instead of having to go to your health care provider to have a sample taken from your cervix, with at-home cervix screening you can collect your sample in the comfort, convenience and safety of your own home.

Who should not screen with at-home cervix screening?
At-home cervix screening is not recommended if you are pregnant. Please speak with your health care provider for screening options. If you are HIV positive or have had a solid organ transplant, at-home cervix screening is also not recommended for you. Please see your health care provider once a year for a Pap test.

Will I do it correctly? Will it hurt?
You got this! At-home cervix screening is easy and should not hurt. Follow the instructions inside your kit to take a good sample. Only a small vaginal sample is needed.

Who can participate in at-home cervix screening?
At-home cervix screening is currently available to select participants in the Tri-Cities (Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Belcarra, Anmore), New Westminster, Sunshine Coast and Central Vancouver Island. Those selected to participate will receive invitations in the mail.

How often should I screen using at-home cervix screening?
At-home cervix screening is highly effective at finding those at risk of cervical cancer. This means that you can safely go longer between screenings. Screening for HPV every five years is as safe as having a Pap test every three years.

I’m worried about my results. What should I do?
Learning that a high-risk HPV type was found may cause many feelings and raise a number of questions. It is rare for you to have cervical cancer when a high-risk HPV type was found. However, it is important for you to go to all of your follow-up appointments.

Should I tell my partner my results?
It is your choice whether or not you tell them. HPV is very common and most people who are sexually active will get HPV at some point in their life. In fact, over 70% (70 out of 100) of all sexually active, unvaccinated Canadians will have at least one HPV infection in their lifetime.

Should my partner get screened?
Anyone with a cervix, including women and transgender people, between the ages of 25 and 69 should receive routine cervix screening. If your partner does not have a cervix, there is no screening test available at this time. However, it is important for your partner to see their health care provider for regular check-ups and to talk to them about their concerns.

What if I’m experiencing symptoms?
If you have vaginal bleeding after sex, between periods or after menopause; abnormal or increased vaginal discharge; unexplained pelvic pain or pain during sex, talk to your health care provider. It is important to investigate these symptoms - even if your screening results are normal.

Should I get the HPV vaccine?
Anyone age 9 and older can get the vaccine. The vaccine is very effective at protecting against HPV types that cause most cervical cancers. However, the vaccine does not protect against all types of HPV. You should still get screened even if you have had the HPV vaccine. To learn more, visit www.immunizebc.ca/hpv.

Additional Resources

Brochures
Health Care Provider's Guide
For more information

For more information, please visit screeningbc.ca/cervix

Development of At-Home Cervix Screening Pilot supported by:

Development of At-Home Cervix Screening Pilot supported by: